Posts filed under ‘grant’

Use Target Field Trip Grants to visit Kawainui Marsh sites

Coming Soon: 2009-2010 Applications

Ready to get inspired? Target will award 5,000 grants of up to $800 each for the upcoming school year. So put on your thinking caps and complete an application online anytime between Aug. 5 and Nov. 3, 2009. Only one submission per applicant, please.

About Target Field Trip Grants

As part of their commitment to education, Target created the Target Field Trip Grants program. So far they’ve awarded 7,400 grants, totaling over $6 million, to educators in all 50 states. More than 729,000 students have explored the world outside the classroom with a Target Field Trip Grant!

Go to: http://www.target.com and check out the grants section.

July 25, 2009 at 1:03 am Leave a comment

‘Ahahui Malama I Ka Lokahi receives a Grant from the Office of Hawaiian Affairs (OHA) for the restoration of Na Pohaku o Hauwahine in Kawai Nui Marsh, O‘ahu, a Ramsar Wetland of International Importance.

‘Ahahui Malama I Ka Lokahi receives a Grant from the Office of Hawaiian Affairs (OHA) for the restoration of Na Pohaku o Hauwahine in Kawai Nui Marsh, O‘ahu, a Ramsar Wetland of International Importance.

‘Ahahui Malama i ka Lokahi (AML) is pleased to announce that it has been awarded a grant of $23,066 from the Office of Hawaiian Affairs (OHA) to revegetate endemic plant species and create a wetland bird habitat for the endangered ‘Alae ula (Hawaiian gallinule) at Na Pohaku o Hauwahine in Kawai Nui Marsh, O‘ahu, a Ramsar Wetlands of International Importance. The award is for a one-year period.  As curator of the site, AML works closely with the State DLNR-Division of State Parks and Division of Forestry and Wildlife to protect and enhance the site’s cultural, ecological, and archaeological treasures.

AML will use a part-time person skilled in Hawaiian cultural practices and the restoration of Hawaii’s natural resources to help lead the restoration efforts by volunteer individuals and groups and assist with teacher-training at Na Pohaku o Hauwahine. AML will improve the water pumping system, which is needed during dry periods. AML will also acquire from native Hawaiian plant growers a range of native dry forest plants and associated plant propagation supplies that would allow for the continued expansion of the 12-acre planted areas of Na Pohaku o Hauwahine. AML will enlist the services of college students and professors and other volunteer professionals in the GPS and GIS mapping of on-site botanical and cultural resources of Na Pohaku o Hauwahine.

AML has received grants in the past from the LEF Foundation, Ducks Unlimited, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the North American Wetlands Conservation Act for the dryland forest and wetland bird habitat restoration at Na Pohaku o Hauwahine. The OHA grant will allow for continued work through 2008.  AML will also seek a Ramsar Convention Grant to promote the Kawai Nui/Hamakua Marsh Complex as one of the United States’ 22 wetlands of international importance.

‘Ahahui Malama I Ka Lokahi’s mission is to develop, promote, and practice a Native Hawaiian conservation ethic relevant to our times that is responsible to both the Hawaiian culture and science. This ethic is protective of native cultural and natural heritage and is expressed through research, education, and active stewardship. AML’s website is http://www.ahahui.net.

November 14, 2007 at 10:46 pm Leave a comment


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